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COMPENSATION FOR INJURY TO FEELINGS IN DISCRIMINATION CASES

Posted: 15th July 2021

Sections 119 and 124 of the Equality Act 2010 provide for compensation for injury to feelings.

If a tribunal finds that your employer has discriminated against you, you may be entitled to claim for compensation specifically relating to the hurt and embarrassment you have suffered as a result of the discrimination. This type of competition is commonly known as “injury to feelings” compensation. This type of compensation can be awarded to you in addition to other compensation for losses you have suffered.

The relevant level of compensation was originally set by the Court of Appeal in the leading case of Vento v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police.

There are now three recognised bands of compensation. As at 06.04.2021 the bands were as follows;

  • Lower band – for less serious cases - £900 – 9,100.00
  • Middle band – for more serious cases - £9,100.00 - £27,400.00
  • Upper band – for most serious cases - £27,400.00 - £45,600.00

 

Compensation will be based upon how the discrimination affected you. To support a claim for “injury to feelings” you must provide evidence to the tribunal demonstrating how the discrimination affected you and the impact it had on you, your relationships etc.

This article is intended for general information purposes only and should not be relied upon in place of specific legal advice. If you have an employment query then please do not hesitate to contact our litigation team for advice and assistance.


EMPLOYMENT LAW UPDATE –  CHANGES TO THE FURLOUGH SCHEME SET TO BE INTRODUCED ON 01 JULY 2021

Posted: 22nd June 2021

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (furlough) has been extended by government on a number of occasions over the last year and will now be available until 30 September 2021.

Currently the government will contribute 80% of wages for hours not worked (capped at £2,500.00 per month or hours not worked). Employers must still pay national insurance and pension contributions during this period but do not have to “top up” the employees’ wages.

 

From 01 July 2021, the level of grant payable by the government will reduce to 70% of wages for hours not works (capped at £2,500.00 per month for hours not worked). 

 

Employers must then “top up” employee wages by at least 10%, resulting in the employee continuing to receive 80% of their wages. The employer must continue to pay national insurance and pension contributions during this period.

 

Employers can choose to pay employees more than the 80%, if they wish to do so however, the government will not fund the additional cost.

This article is intended for general information purposes only and should not be relied upon in place of specific legal advice. If you have an employment query then please do not hesitate to contact our litigation team for advice and assistance.

 

 


LANDLORD AND TENANT UPDATE – NOTICE PERIODS CHANGE FROM 01 JUNE 2021

Posted: 3rd June 2021

Due to the coronavirus pandemic the government introduced measures to protect tenants from eviction.

 

Most recently, in most situations, landlords had to give tenant’s at least 6 months’ notice before being able to issue court proceedings to gain possession of their property.

 

National lockdown restrictions are easing and so too, are the laws which were put in place by government in respect of landlord and tenants.

 

From 01 June 2021, notice periods have been reduced. Landlords must now give tenants at least 4 months’ notice before commencing legal proceedings to gain possession.

 

This article is intended for general information purposes only and should not be relied upon in place of specific legal advice. If you have a landlord and tenant query then please do not hesitate to contact our litigation team for advice and assistance.


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